Living Independently

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Financial Literacy for Parents and Students

Dear Parents:When your children leave home for college, they will face a host of new experiences and responsibilities. As a parent, you recognize that now they will be "on their own" to tackle life's basic functions - at the same time that they are adjusting to a new environment and new freedoms. To help your student in this transition, he/she should know the "financial facts of life" before opening that first checking account or making that first purchase on credit.
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How to Develop Good Spending Habits in College

Balancing fun and finances is never easy, especially in college. During these memorable years, students should balance their education and social lives.So, what exactly is the best way to ensure you’re setting yourself up for a healthy financial future during and after school? For the most success in developing great spending habits and making intelligent […]
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Basic Life Skills Your Student Needs Before Going To College

College is a time where young adults go off into the “real world” and begin to become adults. There are many skills that we assume these young adults have, but they may not know how to apply them in their own environment. These skills may seem obvious to us, but in order to set our […]
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What College Students Need For A Car

The time has finally come for your baby to make the big leap from your nest into the vast world of college. Books, classes, meal plans, and living arrangements can add up quickly along with the fact that your student still must have a dependable means of transportation. Determining how your child will get around […]
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Insuring Your Student

The Importance of Insurance for Your Student As your baby birds begin to leave the nest, there are always a few things that us college parents are concerned about. Did I teach them enough? Can they really do their own laundry? Do they even know how to make rice? Take a breather, parents! You have […]
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Thirty percent of freshmen won’t return for their sophomore year

William Stixrud and Ned Johnson, are the authors of “The Self-Driven Child: The Science and Sense of Giving Your Kids More Control Over Their Lives and report in their New York Times article that "thirty percent of freshmen won’t return for their sophomore year, and the wheels can start to fall off as early as Thanksgiving." They suggest that what your college student needs most is practice running his or her own life — and college is a risky place to do that for the first time."
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How To Ensure Your College Student Eats Well

Every parent wants the best for their kid, and eating well is a huge part of that. Eating the right foods will help your college student be more healthy, have more energy, and spend less. This will help them do better on their tests, save more money, and feel happier as a result. But you […]
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Five Practical Financial Tips for College Students

College can be one of the best times of your life, albeit stressful and difficult at times, but a valuable point in one’s personal life and growth.  College can also be one of the most expensive.  As we have written before, the average 2016 college grad left college with $37,172 in student debt.  Here are five practical financial tips for college students.
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How Parents Can Help Make College Move-In Day A Success

Moving your student to college is often filled with stress, sweat and emotion.  So being prepared is vital to making the most of this moment and leaving your student on campus both confident and secure.
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5 Questions Every Parent, Student Should Ask About Campus Safety

College families and their students are wise to consider some practical questions about campus safety.
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Research Speaks: 3 Ultimate Tips for Finding a Job as a College Graduate

Tips for college parents in supporting their new college graduate in finding a job.
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Five Financial Tips for College Students

College can be one of the best times of your life, albeit stressful and difficult at times, but a valuable point in one’s personal life and growth.  College can also be one of the most expensive.  As we have written before, the average 2016 college grad left college with $37,172 in student debt.  Here are five practical financial tips for college students.
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State Insurance Commissioners Recommend Renters Insurance for College Students

Nearly twice as many state insurance commissioners recommend renters insurance to college students in 2016 as did in 2013. In fact, the latest trend builds on an earlier report by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) that recommended college students consider the benefits of purchasing renters insurance. NAIC recommends that “college students renting an off-campus apartment or house while away at school should consider purchasing renters insurance to protect their personal property, such as a computer, electronics, bicycle or furniture, in the event that it is damaged, destroyed or stolen.”