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What I Read Over my Winter Vacation

While many of you were catching up on your pleasure reading over the recent holidays, I took a different route.Call me a martyr, but one of the many higher-ed-related tomes I tackled by the fire on those dark late December nights was Tuition Rising: Why College Costs So Much , published by Harvard University Press and written by Ronald G. Ehrenberg, director of the Higher Education Research Institute at Cornell University. I really welcomed the nearby fire, because Prof. Ehrenreich's conclusions were rather chilling.
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College Parents of America, Humor – College Student Of the Month Award

The sixth comic in the College Parents of America Humor series is now available on Collegeparents.org.
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College Parents of America, Weekend Reading Room (4/25/14)

  image of NYC library reading room by flickr user MichaelKuhn_pics (cc license) Looking for an early jump on your Sunday paper? College Parents of America recommends that you try these recent stories about higher education.
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College Without Completion — Post #2

 Last week, we posted College without Completion -- Post #1, which discussed National Center for Educational Statistics's published statistics on cohort graduation rates. We continue the College without Completion thread with this post.(image by flickr user ben.chaney)In the last College without Completion post, we shared that, according to NCES, 42.7% of students did not get a bachelor's degree from the college at which they began within 6 years (Source). In this post, we look at the effects of leaving college without a degree. There are multiple ways in which a student and his or her immediate family might be affected by a student's decision to leave college.A student's potential earnings, as well as a student's quality of life, can be greatly diminished by the lack of a degree.Students who have some college but no degree face a higher unemployment rate and sub-median weekly pay check (Source).Students with a bachelor's degree or a higher degree report a lower level of poverty, a slightly higher job satisfaction rate, a lower obesity rate and children that are better prepared for school (Source).