degree

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How Big a Problem is Student Loan Debt?

  Recently, the Atlantic posted an article called The Myth of the Student-Loan Crisis. It's worth the quick read, but it's also worth a discussion. 
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Highlights from Department of Education’s Digest Of Education Statistics: 2012

    Every year, the U.S. Department of Education releases their Digest of Education Statistics. The most recent release, Digest of Education Statistics: 2012, came out last month. These statistics reveal much about major trends in college enrollment, achievement, costs, and outcomes. Below are a list of highlights, key figures and a handful of helpful tables. 
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Why College Is Worth the Investment

We fundamentally believe in the value of higher education to advance the quality of the lives of the students, families and communities where they eventually serve. 
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College Without Completion — Post #2

 Last week, we posted College without Completion -- Post #1, which discussed National Center for Educational Statistics's published statistics on cohort graduation rates. We continue the College without Completion thread with this post.(image by flickr user ben.chaney)In the last College without Completion post, we shared that, according to NCES, 42.7% of students did not get a bachelor's degree from the college at which they began within 6 years (Source). In this post, we look at the effects of leaving college without a degree. There are multiple ways in which a student and his or her immediate family might be affected by a student's decision to leave college.A student's potential earnings, as well as a student's quality of life, can be greatly diminished by the lack of a degree.Students who have some college but no degree face a higher unemployment rate and sub-median weekly pay check (Source).Students with a bachelor's degree or a higher degree report a lower level of poverty, a slightly higher job satisfaction rate, a lower obesity rate and children that are better prepared for school (Source).
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College Without Completion — Post #1

2 in 5 students who attend college fail to get a degree from the college at which they began within 6 years.(pic from flickr user smemon87)This scary statistic is based on data from the U.S. Government's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). According to the NCES, 42.7% of students did not get a bachelor's degree from the college at which they began within 6 years.