Can You Trust Journalism?

By: Reyna Gobel MBA, MJ As a journalist myself, I’d like to say the answer is always yes. Unfortunately, it depends on the publication and the writer. I recently attended a Reuters Institute panel with Google, Vox Media, The New York Times, and Oxford University to get their thoughts on discovering the validity of digital […]
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By: Reyna Gobel MBA, MJ

As a journalist myself, I’d like to say the answer is always yes. Unfortunately, it depends on the publication and the writer. I recently attended a Reuters Institute panel with Google, Vox Media, The New York Times, and Oxford University to get their thoughts on discovering the validity of digital journalism.

  1. Google does rank for trustworthiness.

Google will rank articles and writers that are cited often early in the Google search.  So while you can’t tell the validity of articles immediately, you can tell at least if other people do read this source. You can also google the authors name to see where the authors name is found  elsewhere. The extra step of researching an article author may not be worth it for something when you want to research quickly, but it useful when looking for someone you trust and recommend on a topic you read about often. OR you need the information you read to be actionable. For example, I’m fans of Ron Leiber and Lynette Khaflani Cox on student loans, paying for college, etc. Even if you read every word I write and all my books, still read them.

2. Search your favorite sites in addition to Google firsts.

While Google does prioritize expert articles, some article slip through the cracks due to just having amazing SEO titles.

3. What sources are quoted.

 

Some stories may pop up for great SEO friendly headlines.

  1. Service to the audiences rather than just publishers. 

Undoroedicrable, truth, the story no one knows yet.

Bugs 

Didnt grow up folding 

Easy to find on search. Broadening audience. Less contained. Not just fed news. 

NYT complicated news environment war zones. Capturing images. Parsing data. Transparent about that effort.

“Cant control how characterized but can control how stories are produced.”

Search, ranking trustworthy and relevant to search results. Range of sources. Perspectives. Credibility. 

Full coverage. Fact checks. Highly cited sources.

  1. A hope for action.